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[{"id":626208,"name":"Lecture Bundle 1: Fasting"},{"id":626209,"name":"Lecture Bundle 3: Food for Health"},{"id":626234,"name":"Lecture Bundle 2: Fuels Make a Difference"},{"id":626235,"name":"Lecture Bundle 4: Global Conversations"},{"id":632283,"name":"Lecture Bundle 5: Environmental Medicine"}]
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AIC 2020 Proceedings Bundles

Lecture
Up to 19.5 CME Credits
  • If you are a member, and you are logged in, your 10% member discount has been automatically applied. More Info
  • IFM now offers a military discount! More Info

This year’s Annual International Conference (AIC) offered clinical takeaways for decreasing the risk and severity of chronic and infectious diseases and explored new innovations in preventing systemic imbalances and restoring optimal health. If you missed the live stream event, you may purchase the entire conference proceedings or choose from four a la carte topic-focused session bundles. Conference proceedings in the specialized eLecture bundles are eligible for CME credit. Topics include:

  1. Fasting: A Powerful Tool in Chronic Disease
  2. Fuels Make A Difference: Insulin & Nutritional Ketosis In Chronic Illness and Cancer
  3. Food for Health: Critical Choices and Food Ecology
  4. Global Conversations: Sustainable Solutions for Population Health Systems
  5. Environmental Medicine: Finding Health in a Toxic World

*Please note you will receive full CME credits if you purchase all four lectures.
Lecture bundles 3 and 4 both contain Dr. Susan Prescott’s lecture “Dysbiotic Drift and the Modern Health Crisis: Ecological Approaches for People, Place, and Planet” and Dr. Mark Hyman’s lecture “Food Fix: The True Cost of Food.” You will still receive full CME credit for all of the included lectures if you purchase bundles 3 and 4.

Subsequent CME Lecture bundles will be made available for purchase soon.

Additional Information

Lecture Bundle 1: Fasting

Fasting: A Powerful Tool in Chronic Disease

5.5 CME Credits*

Expert clinicians evaluate different fasting modalities and their effects on chronic illness, with actionable takeaways to implement in your practice today. Studies have shown that the biological and cellular mechanisms of aging, inflammation, and many chronic diseases can be altered through various types of fasting. Various forms of fasting (caloric restriction) can strongly impact physiology to improve health and reduce chronic disease via:https://www.ifm.org/learning-center/aic-2020-proceedings-bundles/#cm

  • Weight loss, changes in body composition, and loss of visceral fat
  • Improve metabolic health through improvements in insulin sensitivity, blood lipid markers, hypertension, inflammatory markers- all of which play roles in chronic disease (cancer, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, neurocognitive decline, etc.)
  • Cancer risk reduction/cancer prevention by influencing oxidative stress and cell signaling, reduction in inflammation, autophagy, and improved glucose regulation
  • Reduce risk of neurodegenerative disorders and improve aging/longevity through increased cellular autophagy and stem cell regeneration
Lecture Description Educator
Fasting and Fasting Mimicking: Science and Molecular Mechanisms  

Fasting has been practiced for millennia, but only recently have scientists elucidated its role in adaptive cellular protection, reversal of aging-related oxidative damage, and regulation of inflammation. The physiologic mechanisms leading to favorable metabolic outcomes are in part influenced by impact of fasting on circadian biology and gut microbiome. Genetic and lifestyle factors may also influence long term health-promoting benefits, including reduction in risks of cardiometabolic diseases and cancer

Kurt Hong, MD, PhD
 

Practical Aspects of Fasting and Time-Restricted Feeding

This talk includes discussion of the fundamental problems of long term weight loss – hunger and metabolic rate. Dr. Jason Fung illustrates how fasting changes the hormonal milieu which favors resolution of these two root problems. The use of fasting as a strategy for inducing change is also included. Jason Fung, MD
Clinical Applications of the Fasting Mimicking Diet  

Recent human studies have shown fasting mimicking diet (FMD) to be an effective dietary intervention in management of various chronic diseases. FMD was found to ameliorate metabolic disorders and optimize inflammatory regulation, leading to beneficial changes to body weight and biomarkers of the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer. While additional studies are crucial, if proven to be efficacious in targeted patient populations, FMD offers a promising non-pharmacological approach to improving health at the population level.

Kurt Hong, MD, PhD
Can Fasting Save Your Life?  

This presentation will review the use of fasting (intermittent and prolonged medically supervised fasting) in the treatment of high blood pressure, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, lymphoma and metabolic syndrome.  Indications, contraindications, safety, efficacy and clinical procedures will be reviewed.  Original published research and case reports will be presented.

Alan Goldhamer, DC

Lecture Bundle 2: Fuels Make a Difference

Fuels Make A Difference: Insulin & Nutritional Ketosis In Chronic Illness and Cancer

5 CME Credits*

Expert clinicians discuss the latest findings concerning therapeutic applications of ketogenic diets, with key takeaways you can implement in your practice.

Nutritional Ketosis/ Ketogenic Diet (KD):
  • A well-formulated ketogenic diet producing nutritional ketosis (physiological ketones as a fuel source) is not the same as ketoacidosis; the most abundant ketone body, beta hydroxybutyrate (?HB or ?-OHB), is a superior cellular energy source over glucose for numerous cells and organs, and in particular, the brain
  • BHB inhibits inflammatory gene expression (blocks the activity of the NLRP3 inflammasome)- ketogenic diet results in significant reduction of inflammation
  • Ketones decrease oxidative stress, increase antioxidants, and scavenge free radicals
  • A ketogenic diet results in weight loss and significant improvements in markers associated with metabolic syndrome; it has demonstrated strong efficacy in reversal of type 2 diabetes and significant improvement in cardiovascular risk markers
  • The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of a ketogenic diet appears to confer neuroprotection and is likely preventive in neurologic disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease
Ketogenic diet & cancer:
  • Ketogenic diet as an adjuvant therapy in cancer treatment: cancer cells predominantly utilize glycolysis instead of oxidative phosphorylation to produce ATP (cancer cells become hungry for energy and start taking up several times more glucose than normal cells).
  • Most tumor cells have mitochondrial abnormalities that prevent them from utilizing ketones for energy; with ketosis, cancer cells are starved of energy while normal cells adapt their metabolism to use ketone bodies and survive.
  • ?-OHB effects in cancer include some of the following: reduction of inflammation, induction of cancer cellular apoptosis (cancer cell death), increasing innate immunity, decreased insulin, and decreased insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) – (insulin and IGF-1 are important drivers of cancer cell proliferation)
Insulin:
  • A research-supported, alternate understanding of what actually drives insulin resistance: it’s insulin. (Chronic, physiologic hyperinsulinemia leads to the development of insulin resistance)
  • A key treatment for Type 2 diabetes is a low carbohydrate diet
Lecture Description Educator
 

Effects of Nutritional Ketosis on Inflammation and Type 2 Diabetes

In this presentation, Dr. Stephen Phinney will discuss emerging data regarding the role of nutritional ketosis in the reduction of chronic inflammation. Further, he will explore how this anti-inflammatory effect can improve glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD
 

Ketogenic Diets: Practical Applications

In this talk, Dr. Steven Phinney will discuss how to apply the ketogenic diet practically in a clinical setting. Patient selection, resources for implementation, and the troubleshooting of common issues will be included. Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD
 

Systems Biology and the Journey in Uncertainty

 

In this talk, Dr. Patrick Hanaway will explore his journey through cancer treatment utilizing a Functional Medicine approach. Topics include discussion of the metabolic basis of cancer, the effect of dietary interventions on cancer progression, and the role of lifestyle factors such as sleep, stress management, mind-body medicine, and social connection during cancer treatment.

Patrick Hanaway, MD
A New Paradigm of Insulin Resistance  

This presentation by Dr. Jason Fung will discuss a new paradigm for understanding hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. The classical teaching of insulin resistance involves the paradigm of internal starvation of cells due to the inability of the cell to transport insulin. However, this does not align with the clinical symptoms of insulin resistance, where patients tend to be overweight rather than underweight. Understanding the new overflow paradigm solves the central paradox and shows how dietary change can potentially reverse type 2 diabetes.

Jason Fung, MD

Lecture Bundle 3: Food for Health

Food for Health: Critical Choices and Food Ecology

5 CME Credits*

Expert clinicians explore the effects of nutrition on many chronic conditions and how environmental stressors contribute to overall dysfunction

  • Determining which dietary choices are best can vary; these include assessment through a variety of contexts and may include a wide variety of factors such nutrient density, individualized responses to foods, cultural, social, and other non-medical influences, and ecological/environmental choices.
  • Covid-19 has revealed how disproportionately affected the disadvantaged with pre-existing conditions are and it has demonstrated the weaknesses in social, economic, and environmental systems.
  • The pandemic has also highlighted our vulnerabilities as a measure of declining environmental health and lifestyle diseases; the interconnectedness of our collective health trajectories is dependent on larger systems, both human and planetary/environmental.
  • We must take an integrated “systems” approach, looking at the whole person, root causes, and change dysfunctional systems and relationships to create environments in which health can flourish
  • Industrial food monopolies, economics, food policies, farming practices, environmental degradation and other factors are major determinants in the global manifestations of chronic diseases
  • Agriculture, the quality of our soil, and human health are inextricably linked, so regenerative practices on both the individual and global scales to ensure quality food supplies for health are needed – both now and for future generations
  • High-level wellness occurs when the interests of individuals, societies, and the environment are fully aligned
  • Ensuring access to affordable, healthy food is important for prevention and management of chronic diseases
  • There are tangible ways to help individuals make and maintain healthful dietary behavior changes; one way is to change perceptions around healthy foods and help them to correlate joy, pleasure, and great taste with healthful foods.
Lecture Description Educator
What to Eat? It Depends  

Despite what appears to be a frustrating amount of disagreement in the Nutrition community about what to eat and avoid, a closer look reveals much more agreement than disagreement. A foundational diet that is agreed on across the board, from vegan to ketogenic, is high in vegetables and whole foods, low in added sugars, refined grains and ultra-processed foods. Beyond this, there is substantial room for personalization of an “optimal diet” from lower fat to lower carb, and including such factors as environmental sustainability and social justice – it depends on context.

Christopher Gardner, PhD
Dysbiotic Drift and the Modern Health Crisis: Ecological Approaches for People, Place, and Planet In this talk, Dr. Susan Prescott will review how the microbiome links personal, public and planetary health. The emerging concept of planetary health as a major influencer of the health of human civilization will be discussed, including how human health is intricately connected to the natural systems of the Earth’s biosphere. Susan Prescott, MD, PhD
Food Fix: The True Cost of Food  

It doesn’t seem logical or sustainable that a hamburger costs less than a salad, nor that 70 percent of the world’s human use of water goes to animal production. Our current food system is broken and badly in need of new solutions. In this lecture, Dr. Mark Hyman takes us on a tour of how food and agriculture policies are corrupted by money and lobbies and how this is connected to some of our largest global crises: the spread of obesity and food-related chronic disease, climate change, poverty, violence, educational achievement gaps. Most importantly, Dr Hyman will outline a call to action and how we can individually and collectively work to create change in the system.

Mark Hyman, MD
Unapologetic Deliciousness  

An important barrier to helping patients make and maintain healthful changes in their dietary practices has been the unfortunate perpetuation of a false dichotomy – healthy OR tasty. The timely rise of culinary medicine is providing an opportunity to dispel this myth, and to bring joy, pleasure and great taste back to the foods we encourage our patients to adopt. Chef and physician Michelle Hauser will team up with nutrition scientist Christopher Gardner in a combination lecture and cooking demo to elevate the unapologetic deliciousness of food and blow your taste buds away!

Christopher Gardner, PhD
 

The Intersection of Regenerative Agriculture and Functional Medicine

During this lecture, Dr. Tkach will discuss with key insights into new Rodale Institute research initiatives, (including key findings from our 40-year Farming Systems Trial) which are proving that organic agriculture produces competitive crop yields, can reduce damage in drought years, improve water quality, and enhances the health of both the soil and humans. In addition. Jeff Tkach

Lecture Bundle 4: Global Conversations

Global Conversations: Sustainable Solutions for Public Health Systems

4 CME Credits*

Functional Medicine plays a pivotal role in addressing systemic imbalances, not only for individual health, but for the delivery and efficacy of modern health care. Within the context of a global pandemic, Functional Medicine has the tools to support health now and improve outcomes in the future, through systemic changes in health care on both the policy and practice levels. Engage in this conversation with Global Conversations: Sustainable Solutions for Public Health Systems.

Lecture Description Educator
 

The Global Pandemic: A Challenge and Opportunity for Functional Medicine

In this talk, Dr. Jeff Bland addresses the need for favorably modulating immune function during a time of heightened potential infection. Jeffrey Bland, MD
 

Dysbiotic Drift and the Modern Health Crisis: Ecological Approaches for People, Place, and Planet

In this talk, Dr. Susan Prescott will review how the microbiome links personal, public and planetary health. The emerging concept of planetary health as a major influencer of the health of human civilization will be discussed, including how human health is intricately connected to the natural systems of the Earth’s biosphere. Susan Prescott, MD, PhD
 

The Radical Redesign of Healthcare: What NOW?

Guided by her “Whole Health” approach to influencing the health and wellbeing of veterans and their families, Dr. Gaudet explores the need for a radical transformation in what healthcare is, how it is delivered, and the power of community. Tracy Gaudet, MD
Food Fix: The True Cost of Food  

It doesn’t seem logical or sustainable that a hamburger costs less than a salad, nor that 70 percent of the world’s human use of water goes to animal production. Our current food system is broken and badly in need of new solutions. In this lecture, Dr. Mark Hyman takes us on a tour of how food and agriculture policies are corrupted by money and lobbies and how this is connected to some of our largest global crises: the spread of obesity and food-related chronic disease, climate change, poverty, violence, educational achievement gaps. Most importantly, Dr. Hyman will outline a call to action and how we can individually and collectively work to create change in the system.

Mark Hyman, MD
A Unified Theory of Disease  

We are exposed to a more complex array of toxic compounds in our air, water, and food more than ever before. In this talk, Dr. Pizzorno will discuss several factors that lead chronic disease and guide participants through key determinants of individual susceptibility including constant low level toxic exposures, nutrient deficiencies and genetic predisposition.

Joe Pizzorno, ND

Lecture Bundle 5: Environmental Medicine

Environmental Medicine: Finding Health in a Toxic World

4.75 CME Credits*

  • The epidemic of chronic diseases are a result of the intersections of genetic susceptibilities, chronic deficiencies of vitamins, minerals, and other food-sourced nutrients, and persistent low-level exposures to toxins and toxicants in air, food, water, and commercial products.
  • We’ve moved from living in a matrix of health-promoting molecules in synchrony with the environment to a miasma of toxins, deficiencies, and isolation resulting in high disease burden
  • Modern agriculture has dramatically altered our food supply, resulting in poorer nutrient density, contamination with chemicals and metals that disrupt human systems, and this is further compounded by utilization of plastics and other chemical-laden products
  • Cases are used to demonstrate how toxins and toxicants can cause or contribute to immunologic compromise and dysfunction, endocrine disruption and hormonal disorders, and inflammatory and autoimmune illnesses.
  • Which toxicants can or can’t be tested in patients are discussed, and significant exposure sources are also detailed, guiding the practitioner in clinical decision-making.  Illnesses specifically linked to toxicant exposures are also listed, providing additional root-cause considerations when applying the Functional Medicine matrix.
A Unified Theory of Disease  

We are exposed to a more complex array of toxic compounds in our air, water, and food more than ever before. In this talk, Dr. Pizzorno will discuss several factors that lead chronic disease and guide participants through key determinants of individual susceptibility including constant low level toxic exposures, nutrient deficiencies and genetic predisposition.

Joe Pizzorno, ND
 

Environmental Toxins and Toxicants: Case-Based Discussions – Part 1 

This session by Dr. Lyn Patrick and Dr. Marianna Marchese will focus on an Environmental Medicine perspective on toxic exposures and their effect on health status. A variety of cases describing environmental toxins and toxicants will be used to facilitate a case-based discussion- Part 1 Lyn Patrick, ND  & Marianne Marchese, ND 
 

Environmental Toxins and Toxicants: Case-Based Discussions – Part 2

This session by Dr. Lyn Patrick and Dr. Marianna Marchese will focus on an Environmental Medicine perspective on toxic exposures and their effect on health status. A variety of cases describing environmental toxins and toxicants will be used to facilitate a case-based discussion- Part 2 Lyn Patrick, ND  & Marianne Marchese, ND 

CME Information

CME Credit type

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


IFM is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

MD/DO: The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 18.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ACCME-accredited courses for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ are eligible for Category 2 credit through the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). To obtain the Category 2 credit please email, fax, or mail certificates of attendance to the AOA Department of Client and Member Services. For more information click here.

ABIM MOC Points Available: Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 18.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

DC: Northwestern Health Sciences University (NWHSU) provides continuing education credit for chiropractic physicians. IFM submitted an application to NWHSU who applied to all states, except Alabama, Arizona, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. For a complete list of states and approval hours, please contact cme@ifm.org.

ND: Generally, naturopathic state licensing boards accept continuing education courses accredited through the ACCME. Please contact your state naturopathic board to inquire if CME credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

Nursing Professional: For the purpose of re-certification with the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), contact hours approved through ACCME are accepted. Please contact your state nursing board to inquire if continuing education credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

PA: The American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accepts all continuing education credits from organizations accredited by the ACCME. Please contact your state physician assistant board to inquire if continuing education credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

RD: The Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) automatically accepts CME courses accredited for AMA PRA Category 1 creditsTM through the ACCME. Therefore, pre-approval is not required of IFM. Please check with your state licensing board to inquire if prior approval by CDR is required to obtain continuing education credits for an activity despite this circumstance. 

Acupuncturist: IFM is a continuing education provider (provider #0232) of the California Acupuncture Board (CAB). An application will be submitted to CAB. Per the Recertification Handbook of the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM), courses approved by a state acupuncture regulatory board are eligible to submit with the re-certification application. Please contact your state acupuncture board to inquire if continuing education credits approved by the CAB are accepted. Note: California acupuncturists must attend this course in full to receive CPEUs. Partial credit is not available.

Other: Please contact your healthcare licensing board to inquire if continuing education credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are recognized and accepted toward fulfilling your continuing education requirements.

*CME credits are subject to change.