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Focus on Dementia and Alzheimer’s

Lecture

Three lectures that focus on the genetic and lifestyle factors impacting the development of dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Up to 3 CME Credits
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  • Length: This eLecture package is approximately 3 hours.
CME Credit type

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Description

As the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases continues to increase,1 physicians need to know what genetic,2,3 environmental,4 and lifestyle factors5 affect cognitive ability. Which of your patients are at risk?

In this package of three lectures, experts describe the genetic and lifestyle factors that predispose and influence our likelihood of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Rudolph Tanzi, PhD, focuses on the genetic factors underlying our risk for cognitive decline. Dale Bredesen, MD, shares case studies demonstrating successful treatment of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. David Perlmutter, MD, FACN, ABIHM, discusses the physiological basis for neuronal inflammation and growth.

These lectures provide a foundation for successful assessment and treatment of patients with cognitive decline. Understanding the genetic, lifestyle, and neuronal basis for cognitive health and cognitive decline provides new insights into helping your patients.

Learning Objectives

  1. Recall the wide array of factors that increase neurodegenerative processes.
  2. Describe emerging data showing how diet, mental and physical stimulation, the human microbiome, and various other factors can have profound positive effects on brain health.
  3. Describe the emerging hypothesis that effective therapies to prevent and reverse Alzheimer’s disease should be personalized to each patient and address their individual array of underlying factors.
  4. Recall how the interplay of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors (e.g., sleep, diet, exercise, intellectual stimulation, and social engagement) contribute to neuroinflammatory processes and how they can be applied to reduce neuroinflammation.

Lectures Included

Lecture Description Educator
What Can Alzheimer’s Disease Teach Us About the Brain and Self? Recent genetic studies have identified a set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A model emerges showing that AD risk is reduced by processes that suppress inflammatory cytokine signaling and enhance clearance of debris, including amyloid. Dr. Rudolph Tanzi, one of the foremost experts in Alzheimer’s disease, will explore the interplay of genetic susceptibility factors and environmental and lifestyle factors—including sleep patterns, diet, level of exercise, intellectual stimulation, and social engagement—that can all affect neuroinflammation. He will then review emerging and potential new therapies in prevention and treatment. Rudolph Tanzi, PhD
Rewiring the Damaged Brain Brain degeneration, especially dementia, is a complex condition. One in ten persons over 65 and nearly half of those over 85 have Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While billions of dollars have been spent on research, therapeutic improvement has been marginal and unsustained. The past few decades of genetic and biochemical research have revealed an extensive network of molecular interactions involved in AD pathogenesis, suggesting that a network-based therapeutic approach, rather than a single target–based approach, may be potentially more effective as treatment. Based on the hypothesis that AD results from an imbalance in an extensive plasticity network, and that therapy should address as many of the network components as possible, Dr. Dale Bredesen has pioneered a systems-based personalized therapeutic approach. He will discuss the preliminary human trials that have shown improved cognitive function and a reduction in Alzheimer’s-related symptoms. Dale Bredesen, MD
Neuroplasticity, Regeneration, and Expanding Frontiers Until quite recently, it was believed that if the brain were damaged, little could be done to reverse the injury. Prevailing opinion was that the brain was set very early in life—what you came in with was thought to be largely fixed; the brain was hard wired, immutable, with a static number of neurons. That paradigm has dramatically changed. It is now understood that the brain is plastic and malleable, and that it has remarkable regenerative capabilities that we are just learning to appreciate. Conditions as diverse as chronic pain, autism, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s disease are all being viewed anew in light of this changing paradigm. Dr. David Perlmutter, a leading expert in this changing paradigm, will overview both the wide array of factors that increase neurodegeneration and then discuss our evolving understanding of how diet, mental and physical stimulation, the human microbiome, and various other factors can have profound positive effects on brain health, disease resistance, and functionality. David Perlmutter, MD, FACN, ABIHM

Augment your Functional Medicine knowledge with IFM eLectures. Earn CME and update your knowledge on cutting-edge medical topics. See more electures

Note that these lectures are from IFM’s 2017 Annual Conference. If you attended the conference, you cannot claim CME for this package as well.

Additional Information

CME Information

To earn CME credit, you must complete a post-course survey, as well as achieve 80% or higher on the post-course test within four attempts.


ACCME Accreditation Statement

The Institute for Functional Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation Statement

MD/DO: The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this enduring material activity for a maximum of 3.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The American Osteopathic Association has approved IFM’s courses for Preventive Medicine certification within the American Osteopathic Board of Preventive Medicine.

ND: Generally, naturopathic state licensing boards accept continuing education courses accredited through the ACCME. Please contact your state naturopathic board to inquire if CME credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

Nurse: For the purpose of re-certification with the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), contact hours approved through ACCME are accepted. Please contact your state nursing board to inquire if continuing education credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

PA: The American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accepts all continuing education credits from organizations accredited by the ACCME. Please contact your state physician assistant board to inquire if continuing education credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

RD: The Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) did not pre-approve this course. Pre-approval is not required for ACCME-accredited courses. CDR automatically accepts continuing education credits obtained from ACCME-accredited organizations. Please check with your state licensing board to inquire if prior approval by CDR is required to obtain continuing education credits for an activity despite this circumstance.

OTHER: Please contact your healthcare licensing board to inquire if continuing education credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are recognized and accepted toward fulfilling your continuing education requirements.


Release and Termination Date

Release Date: Sep 18, 2017
Last Reviewed Date: Sep 18, 2017
Termination Date: Sep 18, 2020

These lectures were originally recorded at IFM’s 2017 Annual Conference. The eLecture is available as asynchronous CME for those who did not claim CME at the original conference.

Delivery and Return Policy

  • Your eLecture will be delivered electronically to your online account directly upon purchase.
  • The eLecture is provided as a streaming video along with downloadable slides and resources.
  • Recordings will be available to stream for one full year from your date of purchase.
  • Given the nature of digital items, refunds or credits on this purchase are not allowed.

References

  1. Langa KM, Larson EB, Karlawish JH, et al. Trends in the prevalence and mortality of cognitive impairment in the United States: is there evidence of a compression of cognitive morbidity? Alzheimers Dement. 2008;4(2):134-144. doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2008.01.001.
  2. Reitz C. Genetic diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease: challenges and opportunities. Expert Rev Mol Diagn. 2015;15(3):339-348. doi:10.1586/14737159.2015.1002469.
  3. Ringman JM, Goate A, Masters CL, et al. Genetic heterogeneity in Alzheimer disease and implications for treatment strategies. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2014;14(11):499. doi:10.1007/s11910-014-0499-8.
  4. Richardson JR, Roy A, Shalat SL, et al. Elevated serum pesticide levels and risk for Alzheimer disease. JAMA Neurol. 2014;71(3):284-290. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.6030.
  5. Schiepers OJG, Köhler S, Deckers K, et al. Lifestyle for Brain Health (LIBRA): a new model for dementia prevention [published online February 28, 2017]. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. doi:10.1002/gps.4700.

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