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Novel Treatment Approaches to Enhance Neuroplasticity

Lecture

Three themed lectures on emerging therapeutic interventions for neurological conditions.

Up to 2.75 CME Credits
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  • Length: This eLecture package is approximately 2.75 hours.
CME Credit type

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

New Therapies for Cognitive Conditions

Description

As technology continues to evolve, a range of new therapeutic options emerge. Three exciting therapies have emerged for the common, challenging conditions of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and autism. Which of your patients might benefit from these new types of therapy and testing?

In this package of three lectures, experts review new and emerging therapeutic interventions for neurological conditions. Skip Rizzo, PhD, shares how virtual reality can effectively treat PTSD,1 stroke,2 and attention deficits.3,4 Suzanne Goh, MD, focuses on how appropriate mitochondrial testing can tailor autism treatment for a subset of patients with mitochondrial dysfunction.5 Kimberly Cress, MD, shares research into the benefits of using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) therapy to mitigate the effects of depression6 and/or anxiety.7

These lectures provide an introduction to these emerging therapeutic options for patients with a range of neurological conditions. Understanding when brain function will improve using virtual reality, TMS, and mitochondrial testing can help many patients.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify how virtual reality (VR) can be used to assess and treat patients with stroke sequelae, traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, and attention and memory deficits.
  2. Identify patients who may benefit from transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a means to stimulate underactive regions of the brain and to inhibit overactive brain regions.
  3. Combine TMS with Functional Medicine interventions to optimize patient outcomes.
  4. Recognize triggers that can underlie mitochondrial dysfunction, including gene mutations, nutritional insufficiencies, and exposure to various chemicals, heavy metals, certain medications, various bacteria and viruses, and chronic stressors.
  5. Evaluate emerging evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction with autism spectrum disorders.

Lectures Included

Lecture Description Educator
Virtual Reality, Immersion, Brain, and Body Virtual reality (VR) is the term used to describe a three-dimensional, computer-generated environment that can be explored and interacted with by a person. Skip Rizzo, a psychologist and leader in the field of VR systems, has pioneered the development of VR to test and train attention and memory; to address physical rehabilitation post-stroke and traumatic brain injury; and to apply virtual reality–based exposure therapy to treat post-traumatic stress disorder. He will review and demonstrate the use of VR as it is applied to a variety of conditions and how VR can assist in the development of new ways to treat the brain. Skip Rizzo, PhD
Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Autism Research studies linking mitochondrial dysfunction to autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) has grown in recent years. Problems with the mitochondria create problems for the whole body—in particular the brain, which uses huge amounts of energy. Many different types of triggers can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, including gene mutations, nutritional insufficiencies, and exposure to various chemicals, heavy metals, certain medications, various bacteria and viruses, and chronic stress. Dr. Suzanne Goh, a pediatric neurologist and researcher in the field of mitochondrial dysfunction and autism, will review what we know about the brain, mitochondria, and ASD. Suzanne Goh, MD
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technology increasingly used in the treatment of major depression for those who haven’t responded to antidepressant medications and/or experience medication side effects. The basic principle of TMS is the application of short magnetic pulses over the scalp with the aim of inducing electrical currents in the neurons of that particular region of the brain. In some situations, one stimulates underactive brain regions; in others, one inhibits overactive regions. This therapy supports the notion that modulation of activity along a distributed neural network can induce long-lasting plastic changes, even in the adult brain, and have positive behavioral consequences. TMS has been used increasingly with positive results in anxiety and depression. Dr. Kimberly Cress will present the science and clinical application of TMS and will then answer questions in this emerging field. Kimberly Cress, MD

Augment your Functional Medicine knowledge with IFM eLectures. Earn CME and update your knowledge on cutting-edge medical topics. See more electures

Note that these lectures are from IFM’s 2017 Annual Conference. If you attended the conference, you cannot claim CME for this package as well.

Additional Information

CME Information

To earn CME credit, you must complete a post-course survey, as well as achieve 80% or higher on the post-course test within four attempts.


ACCME Accreditation Statement

The Institute for Functional Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Continuing education credit designation

MDs and DOs: The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 2.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The American Osteopathic Association has approved IFM’s courses for Preventive Medicine certification within the American Osteopathic Board of Preventive Medicine.

For NDs: Generally, state naturopathic boards approve programs accredited by an ACCME provider. Please contact your board to inquire if AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

For Nursing Professionals: For the purpose of re-certification with the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), contact hours approved through ACCME can be used. Please contact your state nursing board to inquire if AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

For PAs: For the purpose of re-certification with the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA), contact hours approved through ACCME can be used. Please contact your state physician assistant board to inquire if AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

For Others: Please contact your board to inquire if AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.


Release and Termination Date

Release Date: Sep 28, 2017
Last Reviewed Date: Sep 28, 2017
Termination Date: Sep 28, 2020

These lectures were originally recorded at IFM’s 2017 Annual Conference. The eLecture is available as asynchronous CME for those who did not claim CME at the original conference.

Delivery and Return Policy

  • Your eLecture will be delivered electronically to your online account directly upon purchase.
  • The eLecture is provided as a streaming video along with downloadable slides and resources.
  • Recordings will be available to stream for one full year from your date of purchase.
  • Given the nature of digital items, refunds or credits on this purchase are not allowed.

References

  1. Maples-Keller JL, Yasinski C, Manjin N, Rothbaum BO. Virtual reality-enhanced extinction of phobias and post-traumatic stress. Neurotherapeutics. 2017;14(3):554-563. doi:10.1007/s13311-017-0534-y.
  2. Laver KE, George S, Thomas S, Deutsch JE, Crotty M. Virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;(2):CD008349. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD008349.pub3.
  3. Rohani DA, Sorensen HBD, Puthusserypady S. Brain-computer interface using P300 and virtual reality: a gaming approach for treating ADHD. Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2014;2014:3606-3609. doi:10.1109/EMBC.2014.6944403.
  4. Wang M, Reid D. Virtual reality in pediatric neurorehabilitation: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism and cerebral palsy. Neuroepidemiology. 2011;36(1):2-18. doi:10.1159/000320847.
  5. Goh S, Dong Z, Zhang Y, DiMauro S, Peterson BS. Mitochondrial dysfunction as a neurobiological subtype of autism spectrum disorder: evidence from brain imaging. JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71(6):665-671. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.179.
  6. Mantovani A, Pavlicova M, Avery D, et al. Long-term efficacy of repeated daily prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in treatment-resistant depression. Depress Anxiety. 2012;29(10):883-890. doi:10.1002/da.21967.
  7. Pallanti S, Bernardi S. Neurobiology of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of anxiety: a critical review. Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2009;24(4):163-173. doi:10.1097/YIC.0b013e32832c2639.

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