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The Brain and the Gut

Lecture

Mechanisms that influence the link between the microbiome and the brain.

Up to 2.75 CME Credits
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  • Length: This eLecture package is approximately 2.75 hours.
CME Credit type

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Description

The link between the microbiome and the brain has been established, but the specific processes by which they affect one another is an area of growing interest.1,2 Disruptions to the microbiome affect the gut-brain axis and influence memory, mood, and cognition.3 Conversely, changes to the brain, including traumatic brain injury (TBI), can affect the microbiome in sometimes startling ways.4

In this package of two lectures, experts discuss interventions to modulate the neurologic and gastrointestinal effects of both cognitive decline and traumatic brain injury. David Perlmutter, MD, FACN, ABIHM, focuses on the effect the microbiome can have on cognitive decline. Datis Kharrazian, DC, DHSc, MS, MNeuroSci, discusses the impact that traumatic brain injury can have on gut function.

This online learning course provides a practical, clinical basis for successful interventions for patients with cognitive decline and traumatic brain injury. Understanding the relationship between the brain and the microbiome provides new insights into treating patients.

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize how changes to the microbiome can influence memory, mood, and cognition.
  2. Design microbiota interventions that may help to prevent and treat anxiety, depression, autism, chronic pain, and Alzheimer’s disease.
  3. Recognize how disruption of the gut-brain axis from traumatic brain injury can lead to self-perpetuating inflammatory processes involving both the brain and the gastrointestinal system.
  4. Design interventions to modulate the neurologic and gastrointestinal effects of TBI.

Lectures Included

Lecture Description Educator
Applications on the Microbiome-Brain Connection A growing body of literature has demonstrated the bidirectional signaling between the brain and the gut microbiome. Not only can psychological and physical stressors affect the composition and metabolic activity of the trillions of bacteria hosted by the human digestive tract, but changes to the microbiome can influence memory, mood, and cognition. In fact, it is likely that modification to the gut microbiome plays a role in a variety of disorders, from anxiety, depression, and autism to chronic pain and Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. David Perlmutter will discuss various ways to modulate the microbiota that may help to prevent and treat these conditions. David Perlmutter, MD, FACN, ABIHM
Traumatic Brain Injury and Its Effects on the Gut-Brain Axis Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. One commonly overlooked effect of TBI is the disruption of the gut-brain axis leading to gastrointestinal dysfunction. The gut-brain axis has bidirectional communication with the visceral enteric nervous system through afferent and efferent neural connections. Communication with the brain also occurs through messenger signals from the gut's microbiota, involving gut peptides, cytokines, and lipopolysaccharides. Disruption of the gut-brain axis from TBI can lead to a chronic, inflammatory, vicious sequela involving both the brain and the gastrointestinal system, with both neuroregulatory and neuroimmunological loops. Dr. Datis Kharrazian will discuss TBI, its effects on the gut-brain axis, and what we can do to modulate those effects. Datis Kharrazian, DC, DHSc, MS, MNeuroSci

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Note that these lectures are from IFM’s 2017 Annual Conference. If you attended the conference, you cannot claim CME for this package as well.

Additional Information

CME Information

To earn CME credit, you must complete a post-course survey, as well as achieve 80% or higher on the post-course test within four attempts.


ACCME Accreditation Statement

The Institute for Functional Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation Statement

MD/DO: The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this enduring material activity for a maximum of 2.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The American Osteopathic Association has approved IFM’s courses for Preventive Medicine certification within the American Osteopathic Board of Preventive Medicine.

ND: Generally, naturopathic state licensing boards accept continuing education courses accredited through the ACCME. Please contact your state naturopathic board to inquire if CME credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

Nurse: For the purpose of re-certification with the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), contact hours approved through ACCME are accepted. Please contact your state nursing board to inquire if continuing education credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

PA: The American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accepts all continuing education credits from organizations accredited by the ACCME. Please contact your state physician assistant board to inquire if continuing education credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are accepted.

RD: The Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) did not pre-approve this course. Pre-approval is not required for ACCME-accredited courses. CDR automatically accepts continuing education credits obtained from ACCME-accredited organizations. Please check with your state licensing board to inquire if prior approval by CDR is required to obtain continuing education credits for an activity despite this circumstance.

OTHER: Please contact your healthcare licensing board to inquire if continuing education credits from ACCME-accredited organizations are recognized and accepted toward fulfilling your continuing education requirements.



Release and Termination Date

Release Date: Sep 18, 2017
Last Reviewed Date: Sep 18, 2017
Termination Date: Sep 18, 2020

These lectures were originally recorded at IFM’s 2017 Annual Conference. The eLecture is available as asynchronous CME for those who did not claim CME at the original conference.

Delivery and Return Policy

  • Your eLecture will be delivered electronically to your online account directly upon purchase.
  • The eLecture is provided as a streaming video along with downloadable slides and resources.
  • Recordings will be available to stream for one full year from your date of purchase.
  • Given the nature of digital items, refunds or credits on this purchase are not allowed.

References

  1. Galland L. The gut microbiome and the brain. J Med Food. 2014;17(12):1261-1272. doi:10.1089/jmf.2014.7000.
  2. Lyte M. Microbial endocrinology in the microbiome-gut-brain axis: how bacterial production and utilization of neurochemicals influence behavior. PLoS Pathog. 2013;9(11):e1003726. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1003726.
  3. Zonis S, Pechnick RN, Ljubimov VA, et al. Chronic intestinal inflammation alters hippocampal neurogenesis. J Neuroinflammation. 2015;12:65. doi:10.1186/s12974-015-0281-0.
  4. Kharrazian D. Traumatic brain injury and the effect on the brain-gut axis. Altern Ther Health Med. 2015;21(Suppl 3):28-32.

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