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Using Lifestyle to Treat Neurodegenerative Disorders

Lecture

Three lectures on effective, sustainable lifestyle change for your patients seeking to prevent and reverse cognitive decline.

Up to 3.25 CME Credits
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  • Length: This eLecture package is approximately 3.25 hours.
CME Credit type

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Accreditation Statement
The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 3.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Description

As the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases continues to increase,1 lifestyle treatments to prevent and reverse cognitive decline have become increasingly important.2 What can you safely recommend to patients? What interventions does the evidence support?

In this package of three lectures, experts describe the physiology of lifestyle interventions for cognitive health. Functional Medicine expert John Ratey, MD, focuses on how movement and exercise affect the brain. Terry Wahls, MD, shares the latest research on nutrition for cognitive health. Finally, psychologist Rick Hanson, PhD, shares a model for increasing healthy neuroplasticity.

Many clinicians struggle to prescribe lifestyle interventions.3,4 These lectures provide the foundation for successful lifestyle interventions for patients with neurodegeneration.

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize the utility of aerobic exercise for promoting neurogenesis and angiogenesis, nerve growth factors, and improving Central Nervous System (CNS) function.
  2. Develop personalized exercise programs that support cognitive function in both healthy aging and early dementia.
  3. Identify nutritional factors that help to prevent cognitive decline.
  4. Design nutritional and lifestyle interventions to protect the brain and enhance cognitive function.
  5. Recognize neural mechanisms of positive brain change and how to overcome the brain’s evolved negativity bias.
  6. Apply cognitive approaches to anxiety, depressed mood, and sense of helplessness.

Lectures Included

Lecture Description Educator
Positive Neuroplasticity: Using the Mind to Sculpt the Brain “Neurons that fire together, wire together.” Recent science has shown that specific targeted mental activities can strengthen the neuronal substrates of key psychological resources, including resilience, self-control, and optimism. Dr. Rick Hanson, a leader in this new paradigm, will cover neural mechanisms of positive brain change and how to overcome the brain’s evolved negativity bias, which flattens response to treatment and undermines patient motivation. His presentation will offer practical ways to apply these approaches to anxiety, depressed mood, and sense of helplessness. Rick Hanson, PhD
Retraining the Brain With Movement and Exercise Substantial research supports the utility of aerobic exercise for promoting brain plasticity and improving CNS function in many conditions. Aerobic exercise is associated with increased neurogenesis and angiogenesis, as well as the production of neurotrophic molecules such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and other growth factors involved in neuroprotection and the promotion of cell survival and synaptic plasticity. These plasticity-promoting strategies are able to produce clinically significant changes. Aerobic exercise programs lasting just a few months can significantly benefit cognitive functioning in both healthy aging and early dementia. They have also been shown to increase brain volume in a variety of regions and enhance brain network functioning. Dr. John Ratey will describe the latest science on exercise and brain plasticity and detail clinically relevant strategies to get the most out of exercise. John Ratey, MD
Dietary Approaches to Treating and Preventing Neurodegeneration Diet is key to enhancing or hindering brain function and preventing or stimulating neurodegeneration. In this session, Dr. Terry Wahls will explore the nutritional factors that lead to damage and decline, as well as the factors that enhance and protect the brain. Dr. Wahls will present a skill-building session that will inform participants how to uncover dietary issues related to neurodegeneration. Terry Wahls, MD

Augment your Functional Medicine knowledge with IFM eLectures. Earn CME and update your knowledge on cutting-edge medical topics. See more electures

Note that these lectures are from IFM’s 2017 Annual Conference. If you attended the conference, you cannot claim CME for this package as well.

Additional Information

CME Information

To earn CME credit, you must complete a post-course survey, as well as achieve 80% or higher on the post-course test within four attempts.


ACCME Accreditation Statement

The Institute for Functional Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Continuing education credit designation

MDs and DOs: The Institute for Functional Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 3.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The American Osteopathic Association has approved IFM’s courses for Preventive Medicine certification within the American Osteopathic Board of Preventive Medicine.

For NDs: Generally, programs that are accredited through the ACCME for CME credits are approved by state naturopathic boards. Please contact your board to inquire if AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME are accepted.

For Nursing Professionals: For the purpose of re-certification with American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), contact hours approved through ACCME can be used. The American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) also accepts continuing education credits from organizations accredited by the ACCME. Please contact your state nursing board to inquire if AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME are accepted.

For PAs: The American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) accepts all continuing education credits from organizations accredited by the ACCME. Please contact your state physician assistant board to inquire if AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME are accepted.

For Others: Please contact your board to inquire if AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME are accepted.


Release and Termination Date

Release Date: Sep 18, 2017
Last Reviewed Date: Sep 18, 2017
Termination Date: Sep 18, 2020

These lectures were originally recorded at IFM’s 2017 Annual Conference. The eLecture is available as asynchronous CME for those who did not claim CME at the original conference.

Delivery and Return Policy

  • Your eLecture will be delivered electronically to your online account directly upon purchase.
  • The eLecture is provided as a streaming video along with downloadable slides and resources.
  • Recordings will be available to stream for one full year from your date of purchase.
  • Given the nature of digital items, refunds or credits on this purchase are not allowed.

References

  1. Langa KM, Larson EB, Karlawish JH, et al. Trends in the prevalence and mortality of cognitive impairment in the United States: is there evidence of a compression of cognitive morbidity? Alzheimers Dement. 2008;4(2):134-144. doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2008.01.001.
  2. Schiepers OJG, Köhler S, Deckers K, et al. Lifestyle for Brain Health (LIBRA): a new model for dementia prevention [published online February 28, 2017]. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. doi:10.1002/gps.4700.
  3. Huang J, Yu H, Marin E, Brock S, Carden D, Davis T. Physicians’ weight loss counseling in two public hospital primary care clinics. Acad Med. 2004;79(2):156-161.
  4. O’Brien MW, Shields CA, Oh PI, Fowles JR. Health care provider confidence and exercise prescription practices of Exercise is Medicine Canada workshop attendees. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016;42(4):384-390. doi:10.1139/apnm-2016-0413.

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